Bouyancy and other matters

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dw1678
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Joined: 25 Apr 2018, 17:15

Bouyancy and other matters

Postby dw1678 » 28 Apr 2018, 14:24

Hello,

I have just purchased an old wooden speedboat and joined the group. It is a 17' rear mount with vee drive that I intend to restore. See photos.

My questions for the gurus of the group are;

1. The boat is not currently registered - is it a legal requirement to have positive bouyancy to be registered in Victoria?
2. I have stripped the boat out including the fibreglass top in preparation for fixing the hull. There are a number of planks requiring replacement, a bit of dry rot in the gunnels and some less than ideal old repairs to fix. Is it still possible to get the square shank copper rivets that have been used originally on the planking?
3. What type of timber did they usually use for the ribs?
4. How can I identify the builder or the hull design? There are no makers plates, marks or any other information that I can find on the hull. I have been able to identify the engine as a Ford 351 Windsor originally fitted to a 1971 Fairlane 500 but this may not be the original motor. The motor drives through a dog clutch and vee drive. All the pictures of similar boats seem to have the rudder mounted externally on the stern and the propeller close to the stern. My boat, however, has the rudder mounted internally on the stern and as a consequence the propeller is mounted further forward. There is a brass skeg mounted mid hull.

I hope someone is able to help me with these.

Kind regards,
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DaveD
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Joined: 11 Mar 2009, 22:25

Re: Bouyancy and other matters

Postby DaveD » 29 Apr 2018, 10:54

A couple more photos of the bow, transom and ribs/planking may give some clues to the builder.
Ribs were often Spotted Gum, there may be other types of timber that were used, maybe somebody else will say.
If the the skeg you're referring to is just past where the prop shaft comes out of the keel, then that's a whip skeg, it's there to stop the prop shaft "whip"/vibrate due to it's length from the v-drive to prop skeg.

retroboat
Posts: 76
Joined: 27 Oct 2014, 13:12
Location: deniliquin nsw

Re: Bouyancy and other matters

Postby retroboat » 29 Apr 2018, 11:01

welcome to the board
A good material for ribs is spotted gum as you will need to steam them to get them to bend into their respective places,
Nails and Roves are available from boatcraft pacific or classic boat supplies which can both be found by doing a google search.
The only real way to find out the builder is by talking to previous owners which could prove to be a bit difficult.
There may be some other people in the club who may be able to give you a better idea if you put some more detailed pictures up, for example a picture from front on showing the bow and a picture showing the transom.
Are the planks plywood or solid timber? this may help to narrow it down a bit.
Good luck with the restoration.

dw1678
Posts: 3
Joined: 25 Apr 2018, 17:15

Re: Bouyancy and other matters

Postby dw1678 » 30 Apr 2018, 21:12

Thanks for the quick responses, I have only had a chance to check the planking and it all appears to be plywood. The more I dig the more rot I find and that is without turning it over to get a good look at the hull.

I have referred my question on buoyancy to Transport Safety Victoria. If it is mandatory the next problem will be where to place it especially to give enough flotation at the stern.

David

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Chivs
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Re: Bouyancy and other matters

Postby Chivs » 30 Apr 2018, 22:27

Ahoy David

It will be interesting what the people who drive computers behind desks come up with!

Unsure of Victorian rules but I am fairly confident they do not inspect boats for registration but give advice as to safety requirements. If it was a new build, or being used as a commercial vessel it would require inbuilt flotation,

None of the boats we run have inbuilt flotation except for a inner tube or two under the bow.

Good luck with the project, not sure if you got the checker plate off yet on the stern but I am guessing there is going to be rot there as well!!

Cheers

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Greg
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Re: Bouyancy and other matters

Postby Greg » 02 May 2018, 08:30

Agree with Chivs, David.

It is a resto and not a new build, so will not be bound by flotation requirements. It'll be interesting to hear what the authorities say, but I haven't heard of any re-registered boats that didn't already have flotation requiring it.

dw1678
Posts: 3
Joined: 25 Apr 2018, 17:15

Re: Bouyancy and other matters

Postby dw1678 » 21 May 2018, 21:19

In relation to bouyancy I received the following from Vicroads:

Hello David

Thank you for the enquiry.

There is no mandated requirement to have buoyancy fitted in order to register a recreational vessel in Victoria, and as it is not a new vessel it is not required to meet the Australian Builders Plate standard.

However, for your own peace of mind we do strongly recommend having basic flotation fitted as a minimum, and ideally having level flotation. I have attached a link to our website that explains the issues and the terms used, and I am happy to chat on the phone if you would like more information.

I would suggest having buoyancy fitted by a suitably qualified person, and the buoyancy performance then calculated using AS1799.1-2009 (Small craft: General requirements for power boats) or an equivalent technical standard.

https://transportsafety.vic.gov.au/mari ... n/buoyancy

Best regards

Richard Peers
Senior Project Officer, Vessel Registration & Inspections

Maritime Safety Victoria
A branch of Transport Safety Victoria

E richard.peers@transportsafety.vic.gov.au
T 03 9655 3495[/color]

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Greg
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Re: Bouyancy and other matters

Postby Greg » 22 May 2018, 18:51

Interesting reading, but as suspected, not necessary to install buoyancy to an existing vessel.

Most of us have a truck tyre tube stuffed up under the bow, but, of course, that does not keep the vessel horizontal. It will at least, providing there is enough buoyancy there, prevent the boat sinking.


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